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Advanced Fertility Center of Chicago ivf

Advanced Fertility Center of Chicago Blog

Fertility, IVF and Egg Donation

SART Releases 2014 IVF Success Rate Report

by on Sep.30, 2016, under IVF Clinic Success Rates, IVF success rates, SART IVF Success Rate Report

The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) has released the 2014 IVF success rate report in 2016.  The SART in vitro fertilization outcome reports have been coming out annually for over 15 years. We are proud of our  consistently high success rates. We encourage people to examine both our IVF success rates and our egg donation success rates and compare them to the national averages as well as to those of other clinics they might consider.

This year’s report represents a significant change in the way the data is reported as compared to the past.  SART is trying to make the report more representative of IVF outcomes as they relate to the current styles of practice in IVF centers in the US.

In the past the SART report showed the IVF outcome data on a per started cycle, per egg retrieval, and per embryo transfer basis.  However, this has basically been done away with in the 2014 report.  The new SART report organizes IVF outcome metrics differently.

I will review some of the main highlights of the new report using screen shots from our own clinic’s 2014 SART report that can be found online at:

https://www.sartcorsonline.com/rptCSR_PublicMultYear.aspx?ClinicPKID=2410


The first section in the outcome tables shows what start calls the Preliminary Cumulative Outcome per Intended Egg Retrieval.  The intention is to show the cumulative chance for having a baby from both the primary embryo transfer procedure and any also any subsequent embryo transfers using frozen eggs or embryos that were not transferred initially.

I think it is unfortunate that SART put this table at the top of the report.  It makes it seem that this is the most important outcome metric.  However, there are problems with this metric including the fact that any embryo transfers with subsequent live births that do not fall within that calendar year will not be included in the cumulative outcome.

SART is extremely focused on singleton pregnancy outcomes.  Many couples with infertility are much less focused on avoiding twins.  The SART report highlights the singleton line in green.  I have highlighted the live birth line in red.  This line shows the cumulative live birth rate per intended egg retrieval.  In my opinion the live birth rate is also important for couples struggling with infertility.

cumulative-live-birth-rates


The next table is referred to by SART as the Preliminary Primary Outcome per Intended Retrieval.  The preliminary primary outcome is the outcome of the first embryo transfer following the egg retrieval.

  • Therefore, if there is a fresh embryo transfer that is done several days after the egg retrieval that outcome would be the preliminary primary outcome.
  • However, if all of the embryos from that egg retrieval were frozen and none were transferred fresh – then the first frozen embryo transfer cycle would give the preliminary primary outcome.
  • If all embryos were frozen from the fresh egg retrieval and preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) was performed and all PGS results were abnormal resulting in no frozen embryo transfer – then the outcome is a failed cycle at that point.

This change in outcome metrics was put into place by SART because in recent years some clinics have moved more to performing frozen embryo transfers and are doing more “freeze all” cycles.  In a freeze all cycle, all embryos are frozen several days after the egg retrieval and then thawed and transferred in a subsequent cycle.  I think that SART should have put this table at the top of the page.

Again, I have highlighted the live birth row which I believe is important in red in contrast to what SART is highlighting in green.

preliminary-primary-per-retrieval


The next table is for what SART refers to as Preliminary Subsequent Outcomes (frozen cycles).  SART defines this as cycles using any frozen thawed eggs or embryos after there has already been a primary outcome.  So for the most part this table represents the frozen embryo transfer success rates for the clinic.  However, it excludes frozen embryo transfers that would have been the primary embryo transfer (from freeze all cycles).

frozen-embryo-live-births


The next table SART calls the Preliminary Live Birth per Patient.  This table is reporting outcomes only for those patients who are new to that specific clinic and starting their first cycle for egg retrieval during that year.  I have no idea why SART thinks that this is an important metric and deserving of its own table.

preliminary-live-birth-patient


The last 4 tables on the page of the new SART report are for donor eggs and donor embryos.  There is a table for live birth outcomes using fresh donor eggs, another table for frozen donor eggs, then frozen thawed embryos from donor eggs, and finally a table for transfers using donated embryos.  These tables are easier to understand because they do not follow the “preliminary” and “subsequent” outcome methodology that SART now uses for the cycles performed using a woman’s own eggs.

fresh-donor-egg-live-birth


There are some interesting and potentially useful features built into the new report. For example, the report now allows the viewer to apply filters to the data set. For example, you can filter frozen embryo transfer cycles to see only those results that had preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) performed on the embryos. Other filters can be applied as well.

SART is an organization of medical and other professionals. SART members are from academic medical centers and also from private practice fertility clinics. SART members could be fertility doctors, nurses, embryologists, lab directors, mental health professionals, attorneys that specialize in reproductive law, and others.

SART members have different agendas depending on the details of their own organizations and business models. Therefore, SART will be pulled in different directions by members with their own agendas. Such a varied organization will never be able to please all members. The major changes in the 2014 SART report seems to have been done in an effort to satisfy some factions within the organization. However, that has led to some problems with the report.

I have been working as a fertility doctor for over 20 years and during that time have used databases and spreadsheets on a daily basis. Understandably, I am very familiar with IVF outcome measures. However, this report was confusing for me until I studied it carefully. It took some time to figure it out. Therefore, I think that this report will be very difficult (or impossible) for the average infertility patient to understand well.

If the 2014 SART report satisfies some SART members regarding their gripes about past year’s reports then maybe it serves the SART organization’s agenda. Overall, I think it is a work in progress.

Our IVF success rates

Our egg donation success rates

IVF pricing plans

Egg donation pricing plans

Richard Sherbahn

Richard Sherbahn, MD is a fertility doctor practicing in the Chicago, Illinois area. Connect with me on Google+


2013 SART IVF Success Rate Report Released

by on Mar.18, 2015, under IVF Clinic Success Rates, SART IVF Success Rate Report

The 2013 SART report was released in early March 2015 by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology. It reports clinic-specific pregnancy outcome results from in vitro fertilization cycles done by SART member clinics in 2013. The SART report is a useful resource for couples considering in vitro fertilization treatment using their own eggs or donor eggs.

Most IVF clinics in the US are SART members and have their data included in this report. A small percentage of clinics choose not to be SART members so their IVF outcome data will not be in it.  However, federal law mandates that all IVF clinics in the US report their data annually to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a federal government agency. The CDC IVF report for a given year is usually released several months after the SART report.

The SART report shows both individual clinic results and national averages for IVF live birth success rates by age of the female partner. It also shows live birth success rates for treatments using donor eggs. Pregnancy and live birth success rates are shown separately for cycles using fresh eggs and embryos and for cycles using frozen embryos.

For the first time, this year’s report also shows pregnancy outcome results for frozen (banked) donor eggs. Egg freezing and egg banking is a new and rapidly evolving technology. Success rates at some clinics using frozen donor eggs are now approaching the success rates for using fresh donor eggs. Not quite as good yet, but getting closer over time.

The report also shows various other statistics for the clinics including a breakdown of diagnosis categories for the patients having IVF and the average number of embryos transferred in the various groups and percentage of singleton, twin and triplet or higher pregnancies. Learn more about the SART and CDC IVF success reports on our website.

Couples needing fertility services can utilize the SART report to compare success rates between clinics that they might consider utilizing. Success rates vary dramatically between programs and it is important for couples to understand the success rates at any fertility clinic they consider.

  • The national average for IVF live birth success per cycle for 2013 was 40%. Our clinic’s IVF results were much better than average at 58%.
2013 IVF success rates our clinic vs. USA average

Our IVF success rates vs. national average 2013


Donor egg live birth success rates 2013 SART

Our donor egg success rates vs. national average 2013

This year SART included a new metric in the report that reports the “percentage of cycles where thaw was attempted that resulted in live birth”. In the past frozen embryo transfer cycles were only reported on a “per embryo transfer” basis. Therefore, in previous SART reports if there was an attempt to thaw and transfer a couple’s embryos but no embryo survived the thaw – the data would not show up at all in the report (it was reported on a “per transfer” basis).

In the current report it shows outcome statistics on a “per thaw cycle” basis and also on a “per embryo transfer” basis. If a clinic has technical problems with embryo freezing and thawing they could have low success rates for both metrics or could have better success rates on a per transfer basis but lower rates per thaw. This would indicate embryos were not surviving well after thawing.

The SART report is a useful and timely tool for couples needing in vitro fertilization or egg donation services. The complete 2013 SART report is available through this link to the SART website. It shows national average pregnancy outcome statistics as well as clinic-specific reports for all SART member clinics.


A comparison of clinic success rates may not be meaningful because patient medical characteristics, treatment approaches and entrance criteria for ART may vary from clinic to clinic.

Richard Sherbahn

Richard Sherbahn, MD is a fertility doctor practicing in the Chicago, Illinois area. Connect with me on Google+


IVF Success Rate Report Released – 2012 SART Report

by on Mar.02, 2014, under IVF Clinic Success Rates, SART IVF Success Rate Report

The 2012 SART report was recently released by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART). This annual report details IVF success rates and egg donation success rates for individual clinics that are members of the SART organization. The large majority of US IVF programs are SART member clinics so their IVF success rates are therefore included in this report.

A separate report on IVF success rates, the US government’s Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report also comes out every year and covers all US clinics (by federal law). However, the CDC report is released much later than the SART report. The CDC report is released in sections with the first part out 4-5 months after the SART report.

The SART report also shows national average statistics. This allows couples with fertility problems that are considering in vitro fertilization to investigate the live birth success rates at any IVF program that they are considering. They can compare the success rates to other programs in their home area, to other programs in the US, and to national averages.

Here is a video showing how to use and interpret the SART report

The data in this report is broken down by age group and also by whether fresh eggs and fresh embryos were transferred to the uterus or whether frozen embryos were thawed and transferred. Cycles using donor eggs are also reported separately both for fresh embryo transfers and frozen embryo transfers.

We are proud of our IVF and egg donation success rates. Our rates have been above national averages for 16 years in a row.

  • For 2012 our live birth success rate for women under age 35 was 55% per egg retrieval compared to the national average of 43%
  • For egg donation our 2012 live birth success rate was 82% per transfer which compares to the national average of 57%

Additional information is included in the SART report including the percentage of pregnancies with twins and triplets, the average number of embryos transferred in the different groups, and information about the diagnosis categories of patients being treated. For example, it gives the percentage of IVF cases that had a male factor infertility diagnosis, and the percentage with diminished ovarian reserve, endometriosis, tubal factor, etc.

The SART report is a valuable asset for couples considering in vitro fertilization or egg donation. They can compare success rates between clinics in order to find the clinic that will best be able to help them build their family.

The 2012 SART report is available through this link to the SART website:

http://www.sart.org/

More about the SART and CDC IVF success rate reports

Richard Sherbahn

Richard Sherbahn, MD is a fertility doctor practicing in the Chicago, Illinois area. Connect with me on Google+


SART Releases 2011 IVF Success Rate Report with Outcome Results for All IVF Clinics

by on Feb.16, 2013, under IVF Clinic Success Rates, SART IVF Success Rate Report

SART has recently released its 2011 IVF success rate report. This report details the in vitro fertilization pregnancy and live birth success rates for all US IVF clinics that are members of the SART organization (Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology).

Almost all IVF clinics in the US are members of SART. However, some clinics are not SART members so their IVF success rates are not in the SART report.

Go to the SART site to research any specific clinic’s IVF success rates for 2011

See our IVF success rates

See our donor egg success rates

ivf-success-rate-graphegg-donation-success

IVF clinics were required to submit their data to SART in November 2012 after they collected the live birth information from all IVF cycles performed in 2011. SART then takes a few months to prepare the data for public distribution.

The same data is reported by IVF clinics to the CDC. The CDC is a US government agency (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Membership and reporting IVF results to SART is voluntary. However, reporting to the US government through the CDC is required under federal law for all IVF centers.

The SART report is a useful tool for couples with infertility that might need to consider in vitro fertilization to get pregnant. Using this report, couples can investigate live birth success rates per IVF treatment cycle in their age group.

Patients needing fertility treatments should investigate IVF success rates at clinics they are considering for treatment.

  • Success rates vary between programs. All IVF clinics to not produce viable pregnancies at the same rate.
  • There are over 200 variables involved with quality controlduring an IVF cycle
  • Two critical variables are the quality of the clinical side of the IVF program and the quality control system in the IVF laboratory

The SART report allows couples to learn about various details about a specific clinic’s success rates and they can compare those numbers to national averages.

Below is a screenshot of a portion of our 2011 SART results page showing live birth rates in 3 age groups (under 35, 35-37 and 38-40) using a woman’s own eggs and fresh embryos.

IVF-gurnee-2011-SART

  • The SART report allows couples to compare success rates of clinics they are considering with national averages and with other clinics in their area.
  • If a clinic you are considering has low success rates compared to the national average, I suggest going somewhere with better success statistics.

There is a video on our website showing how to research IVF success rates using the SART report.

To see the 2011 SART report and check IVF success rates:

  • Go to the SART website
  • Click on the state that you want on the US map
  • Click on any clinic you want to see IVF results for
  • Click “ART Data Report” and the clinic’s IVF statistics for 2011 will come up

Our website has links to the CDC and the SART reports and discusses them in more detail with examples showing how to interpret clinic-specific and national average tables.

A comparison of clinic success rates may not be meaningful because patient medical characteristics, treatment approaches and entrance criteria for ART may vary from clinic to clinic.

Richard Sherbahn

Richard Sherbahn, MD is a fertility doctor practicing in the Chicago, Illinois area. Connect with me on Google+


2011 IVF Live Birth Success Rates Available

by on Nov.25, 2012, under CDC Report on Fertility Clinic IVF Success Rates, IVF Clinic Success Rates, SART IVF Success Rate Report

The Fertility Clinic Success Rate and Certification Act of 1992 mandates that IVF clinics annually give their IVF live birth success rate data to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a US government agency.

IVF cycles  from December 2011 would result in babies being born by about mid October. Then fertility clinics can call patients to get birth information by about November 1st and can submit it to SART and/or the government. SART releases its annual IVF success rate report in January to February. Therefore, the 2011 SART report should be released in January-February 2013. The preliminary CDC report is released several months later and the complete CDC report takes about a full year to come out.

In vitro fertilization clinics have 2 options for reporting outcome statistics to the government:

  1. They can report it to SART, who will publish it on their website (www.SART.org) and pass the data on to the CDC
  2. They can bypass SART and report to Westat, a statistical survey research organization that the CDC contracts with to obtain data from fertility clinics

The CDC publishes a thorough report (www.cdc.gov/art/ARTReports.htm), but it comes out several months later than the SART report for the same year.

Both the CDC and the SART reports show national averages as well as clinic-specific data for all reporting clinics. Unfortunately, some IVF clinics refuse to report their data, as required by federal law. They choose to be listed as a “non-reporting clinic” rather than let the public see their IVF statistics.

  • This suggests they have low success rates
  • Stay away from these clinics
  • A section of the CDC’s “National Summary and Fertility Clinic Success Rates” report lists all of the “non-reporting clinics”

We recently submitted our 2011 IVF live birth success rates to SART, as did most other US clinics. Our outcome statistics are shown below.

Our 2011 IVF Pregnancy and Live Birth Success Rates – Fresh Cycles
IVF statistics for January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011
Age
Cycles
Started
Egg
Retrievals
Clinical Pregnancy Rate
Per Egg Retrieval
Live Birth Rate
Per Egg Retrieval
< 35
208
200
66.5%
60.0%
35-37
83
75
52.0%
45.3%
38-40
60
53
50.0%
33.3%
41-42
10
9 11.1% 11.1%

Egg Donation
Donor success rates

75 embryo transfers 81.3%
Per embryo transfer
80.0%
Per embryo transfer

 

Our 2011 Frozen Embryo Transfer Statistics
Frozen Transfer Statistics for January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011
Age
Frozen Transfers
Clinical Pregnancy Rate
Per Transfer
Live Birth Rate
Per Embryo Transfer
< 35
45
73.3% 66.7%
35-37
20 55.0% 55.0%
38-40
11
54.5% 45.5%
41-44
2
50.0% 50.0%
Egg Donation
Donor success rates
30 76.7% 53.3%

Tight quality control is what makes the biggest difference in outcome statistics. We work hard every day to maintain quality control throughout our fertility practice.

  • The choice of the IVF stimulation protocol for the individual couple is important
  • The doctor must manage the stimulation with careful medication adjustments
  • The nursing staff needs to communicate doctor’s instructions effectively to patients
  • A properly performed egg retrieval procedure is important
  • The laboratory culture environment has over 200 variables affecting egg, sperm and embryo quality
  • A smooth and efficient embryo transfer procedure can be difficult and is a critical factor that affects chances for success
  • The challenge for the fertility clinic is to get and keep a grip on all of these areas

Do your research and find a clinic that you can trust to get the job done effectively.

A comparison of clinic success rates may not be meaningful because patient medical characteristics, treatment approaches and entrance criteria for ART may vary from clinic to clinic.
Richard Sherbahn

Richard Sherbahn, MD is a fertility doctor practicing in the Chicago, Illinois area. Connect with me on Google+


Welcome to the
Advanced Fertility Center of Chicago Blog

Richard Sherbahn, MD is a Board Certified Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility specialist.

Dr. Sherbahn founded the Advanced Fertility Center of Chicago in 1997.

He will post regularly about fertility issues.

Dr. Richard Sherbahn
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